Pubmed- No evidence for stochastic resonance effects on standing balance when applying noisy galvanic vestibular stimula

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Topics are automatically created in this forum from a mix of newsfeeds. Please be aware that we have no control over the quality or factual representation of these postings. Some may be informational, whereas some may be wholly inaccurate.

Always research all options and discuss them with your physician before following any specific directive provided in these articles.

Current feeds are: Google and Pubmed
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Pubmed- No evidence for stochastic resonance effects on standing balance when applying noisy galvanic vestibular stimula

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Sci Rep. 2021 Jun 10;11(1):12327. doi: 10.1038/s41598-021-91808-w.ABSTRACTNoisy galvanic vestibular stimulation (nGVS) at imperceptible levels has been shown to reduce body sway. This reduction was commonly attributed to the mechanism of stochastic resonance (SR). However, it has never been explicitly tested whether nGVS-induced effects on body sway consistently follow a SR-like bell-shaped performance curve with maximal reductions in a particular range of noise intensities. To test this, body sway in 21 young healthy participants was measured during varying nGVS amplitudes while standing with eyes closed in 3 conditions (quiet stance, sway referencing, sinusoidal platform tilts). Presence of SR-like response dynamics in each trial was assessed (1) by a goodness-of-fit analysis using an established SR-curve model and (2) by ratings from 3 human experts. In accordance to theory, we found reductions of body sway at one nGVS amplitude in most trials (75-95%). However, only few trials exhibited SR-like bell-shaped performance curves with increasing noise amplitudes (10-33%). Instead, body sway measures rather fluctuated randomly across nGVS amplitudes. This implies that, at least in young healthy adults, nGVS effects on body sway are incompatible with SR. Thus, previously reported reductions of body sway at particular nGVS intensities more likely result from inherent variations of the performance metric or by other yet unknown mechanisms.PMID:34112904 | DOI:10.1038/s41598-021-91808-w

Source: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/3411290 ... 2&v=2.14.4