Pubmed- Cerebellitis in a human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 carrier: a case report

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Topics are automatically created in this forum from a mix of newsfeeds. Please be aware that we have no control over the quality or factual representation of these postings. Some may be informational, whereas some may be wholly inaccurate.

Always research all options and discuss them with your physician before following any specific directive provided in these articles.

Current feeds are: Google and Pubmed
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Pubmed- Cerebellitis in a human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 carrier: a case report

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BMJ Case Rep. 2021 Jun 7;14(6):e241366. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2020-241366.ABSTRACTHuman T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is a retrovirus associated with adult T-cell lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). In addition to HAM/TSP and ATL, HTLV-I-associated encephalopathy and cerebellar involvement have been reported. We report a case of an 87-year-old Japanese woman presenting with progressive dysarthria and gait disturbance. Neurological examination showed word-finding difficulty, scanning speech, saccadic eye movements, ocular dysmetria, gaze-evoked nystagmus and bilateral dysmetria. There was no motor weakness or spasticity. HTLV-I antibody was detected in both her serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin (57 pg/mL) and IgG index (3.27) were significantly elevated. MRI showed cerebellar swelling. She was finally diagnosed with HTLV-I associated cerebellitis. Two courses of high-dose intravenous methylpredonine therapy attenuated cerebellar ataxia and cerebellar swelling. It suggests that cerebellitis can result from HTLV-I infection, regardless of the existence of ATL or HAM/TSP.PMID:34099448 | DOI:10.1136/bcr-2020-241366

Source: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/3409944 ... 1&v=2.14.4