Pubmed- Prevalence of Vestibular Disorders in Independent People Over 50 That Experience Dizziness

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Topics are automatically created in this forum from a mix of newsfeeds. Please be aware that we have no control over the quality or factual representation of these postings. Some may be informational, whereas some may be wholly inaccurate.

Always research all options and discuss them with your physician before following any specific directive provided in these articles.

Current feeds are: Google and Pubmed
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Pubmed- Prevalence of Vestibular Disorders in Independent People Over 50 That Experience Dizziness

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Front Neurol. 2021 May 20;12:658053. doi: 10.3389/fneur.2021.658053. eCollection 2021.ABSTRACTPeople aged over 50 are the most likely to present to a physician for dizziness. It is important to identify the main cause of dizziness in order to develop the best treatment approach. Our goal was to determine the prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), and peripheral and central vestibular function in people that had experienced dizziness within the past year aged over 50. One hundred and ninety three community-dwelling participants aged 51-92 (68 ± 8.7 years; 117 females) were tested using the clinical and video head impulse test (cHIT and vHIT) to test high-frequency vestibular organ function; the head thrust dynamic visual acuity (htDVA) test to test high-frequency visual-stability; the dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) to measure the impact of dizziness; as well as sinusoidal and unidirectional rotational chair testing to test low- to mid-frequency peripheral and central vestibular function. From these assessments we computed the following measures: HIT gain; htDVA score; DHI score; sinusoidal (whole-body; 0.1-2 Hz with 30°/s peak-velocity) vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain and phase; transient (whole-body, 150°/s2 acceleration to 50°/s constant velocity) VOR gain and time constant; optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) gain and time constant (whole-body, 50°/s constant velocity rotation). Our study showed that BPPV, and peripheral or central vestibular hypofunction were present in 34% of participants, suggesting a vestibular cause to their dizziness. Over half (57%) of these with a likely vestibular cause had BPPV, which is more than twice the percentage reported in other dizzy clinic studies. Our findings suggest that the physical DHI score and VOR time constant were best at detecting those with non-BPPV vestibular loss, but should always be used in conjunction with cHIT or vHIT, and that the htDVA score and vHIT gain were best at detecting differences between ipsilesional and contralesional sides.PMID:34093406 | PMC:PMC8176523 | DOI:10.3389/fneur.2021.658053

Source: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/3409340 ... 1&v=2.14.4